Being a New Creation Means Exchanging Our Old Life for a New One (Colossians 3)

When was the last time you "turned over a new leaf" in life? Were you successful? Why or why not?

The Bible often says that we who belong to Jesus are "new people." The following questions will help you think about what it means to be a new person.

Read Colossians 3:1-4. This verse instructs us to think about heavenly things instead of earthly things. What "earthly things" are you most likely to think about during the day?

What are "heavenly things" that you don't often think about? How would it improve your life if you spent more time thinking about these things?

Read Colossians 3:5-11. Why do you think Paul used such strong language ("put to death")?

Look at the following list of actions which Paul demanded be killed. When have you seen these types of actions glorified or justified in movies, tv or music?
  • Sexual Immorality
  • Impurity
  • Lust
  • Evil Desires
  • Greed
In verse 8, Paul encouraged new Christians to get rid of certain behavior. What are some real life examples of the following harmful behaviors?
  • Anger
  • Rage
  • Malice
  • Slander
  • Filthy Language
How would someone go about killing off or getting rid of these types of behaviors? Which items on these lists do you need to deal with in your life?

Read Colossians 3:12-15. Consider the following list and decide what specific actions you can take to add these positive traits to your life.
  • Compassion
  • Kindness
  • Humility
  • Gentleness
  • Patience
We embrace our new life by exchanging the old for the new. What old stuff are you going to get rid of this week? What new stuff are you going to put on?

Small Group Questions for Easter

Have several people ask the question, “What’s the most important thing you’ve ever done?”

Ask other people, “What do you hope to accomplish in the next several years of your life?”

Tell your class that today you’ll be talking about “life mission” or the one most important thing you do that drives everything else. Tell them that Jesus’ resurrection from the dead is the defining moment in history, so it should be the defining moment in our lives.

Read 1 Corinthians 15:12-19. How does the resurrection impact some of the crucial beliefs of Christianity? 

How would Christianity be different if there was no resurrection? How would you be different without the resurrection?

Read 1 Corinthians 15:50-58. What are some specific ways that the resurrection gives us hope?

If you had been a friend of Jesus when he was on earth, how would the resurrection have impacted your life? 

How do you think his followers then were effected by the resurrection?

Read 1 Corinthians 15:58. What do you think Paul expected of people as a result of the resurrection?

What do you think it means to “give yourself fully to the work of the Lord?”

How can you give yourself fully to the work of the Lord?

What would a life look like that was completely sold out to doing the same things Jesus did? What would it take for you to look like that?

    Closing Challenge:

    Jesus’ resurrection from the dead makes him superior to all other’s who have lived

    Jesus’ resurrection gives us hope for the future and motivation for the present

    The resurrection should motivate us to seek to relive suffering and redeem sin just like Jesus did

    You Never Walk Alone (Matthew 28)


    Is being alone stressful for you or is it refreshing? Why?
    Talk about a time when you've been alone against your will? or Talk about a time when being alone frightened you?
    Why do some people feel lonely even though they are surrounded by people?
    Who are the people in your life that you can cout on to be with you when you most need them?
    Read Matthew 28:18–20. Why do you think Jesus ended by promising to always be with his followers?
    Since Jesus made this promise as He was leaving, what do you think he actually meant?
    What are other Bible verses you know that are similar to this one? (particularly, verses that speak about God's presence with us)
    Does Jesus' promise in Matthew 28 also apply to us? Why or why not?
    How should Jesus' promise to be with us provide motivation for fulfilling the Great Comission?
    How can Jesus' presence change the way you live this week? What is one specific impact this truth will have on your life?
    How can this group pray for and support you?


    Sent from my iPad

    Obeying Jesus' Commands (Matthew 28)

    What lessons has life taught you this week? Do you feel like you've learned them well?

    What are some lessons you've had to learn more than once?

    What lessons would you like to teach to other people in your life? How do you think you could go about teaching that lesson?

    Read Matthew 28:18-20 as a group.

    Which part of these verses has been most meaningful to you over the past few weeks? Why?

    Jesus said to teach new disciples everything He had commanded. As a group, list as many commands of Jesus as you can?

    Which commands of Jesus are most important? (Hint: Mark 12:30-31; John 13:34-35)

    Who is your neighbor?

    Whom do you think Jesus had in mind when He said, "Love one another"? Why?

    Give specific examples of how you can obey each of these particular commands.

    When is it difficult to obey these commands of Jesus? How can difficult times teach us to more effectively obey these commands?

    What situation in your life most needs to have these commands applied? How can you do that? How can this group help you?


    You Are Already Going, Now Make Disciples (Matthew 28)

    If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you go?

    What is the single most important place you need to go tomorrow?

    How many different places did you go today?

    We live in an "on the go" culture. Is this is a good thing or a bad thing? Why?

    Read Matthew 28:18–20. Where do you think Jesus wanted his disciples to go?

    What did He want them to do while they were going?

    Where do you need to go in order to come into contact with people who need to become followers of Jesus?

    What do you think it means to "make disciples"?

    How would you explain your own discipleship journey? What makes you a disciple?

    How can you pass your own identity as a disciple to others? Who are the pele you know who need to become disciples? How can you create an opportunity to go to them?

    Where will you intentionally go this week in order to obey this command? How can the group help you in this journey?



    Sent from my iPad

    A Matter of Authority (Matthew 28)


    Who was the best boss you ever had? What made him/her such a good boss?

    Who was the worst boss you ever had? Why?

    Would you rather have a boss who micro-managed you or who gave you authority to make your own decisions? Why?

    Read Matthew 28:18–20.

    List some examples of Jesus' authority. Where can you see His power demonstrated?

    How had the disciples been witnesses of Jesus' authority? How would your faith have been impacted if you had witnessed many of Jesus' miracles?

    Why do you think Jesus' prefaced his command to the disciples with a reminder of His authority?

    In our efforts to make disciples, how can the reminder that Jesus is in control bring us comfort?

    How can the reminder that Jesus is in control bring us confidence?

    In what way has Jesus given His authority to us?

    As you think about "making disciples", what is your greatest fear?

    How can a reminder of Jesus' authority help alleviate that fear?

    In what part of your life do you need to be reminded of God's control?

    How can the group pray for and encourage you this week?

    Healthy, Sick, Righteous, and Sinners. (Matthew 9)


    What is the worst illness you have ever endured?  What treatment did you receive? How relieved were you when you got better?

    Read Matthew 9:9-13. Do you think following Jesus was a difficult decision for Matthew to make? Why or why not?

    What do you think it means to "follow Jesus?"

    If this story were to happen in West Michigan in 2012, where do you think it might take place? Who do you think would be the tax collectors and sinners? Who do you think would be the Pharisees?

    In verse 12 Jesus suggests that some are "healthy" and don't need a doctor. In verse 13 he seems to say that some are "righteous." If everyone is a sinner (Romans 3:23), than why is Jesus saying that some don't need to be saved?

    Who are these "healthy" and "righteous" people?

    Why did Jesus eat with tax collectors and sinners?

    What do you think Jesus meant when he said, "I desire mercy, and not sacrifice."?

    Sometimes its easy as Christians to find ourselves looking  down on (or judging) the "tax collectors and sinners" of our society. How can we avoid this?

    What does "mercy" look like in West Michigan in 2012? What do you think the "sacrifice" Jesus is talking about  looks like in West Michigan in 2012?

    What do we need to do to be like Jesus in this story?